Letter from the Editor – December 2014

Every organization goes through times when the internal, or home team, cannot execute the testing project easily or quickly enough. The reasons are many, from the lack of an effective test strategy to low automation engineering skill, to staff positions going unfilled due to a great job market. With everyone working and very few people to fill positions, development teams are searching for more and more ways to be leaner and meaner, outsourcing more of their work.

I have worked in many outsourced capacities and engaged with many organizations, individuals and teams as an outsourced consultant. Today, about half my work comes from strategy and test process consulting for other organizations. I am also involved with a professional services team whose work is completely outsourced. LogiGear itself does the majority of its work as an offshore outsourced service organization

The question is no longer if you should outsource, it’s how, how much and what should be outsourced. Figuring this out can be difficult.

Staffing flexibility, getting the right skill at the right time, getting expert help, advice and experience is the norm, and in an increasing number of organizations it is expected. Bring in the most talented experts to get the job done right. In the software development business, getting the right testing and QA skill set, experience requirements, and technical requirements is an increasingly difficult task. Outsourcing is a way to bridge the gaps.

The speed of Agile development and rapid delivery of product of all varieties from downloads to SaaS, makes the time pressure more intense. As a result, a wider variety of services are being outsourced to get the product out the door quickly. Consulting, coaching and other professional services are a great way to increase productivity, automate more and streamline process as well as update practices in strategy, such as action-based testing (ABT) and behavior-driven development (BDD). Getting outside help to make excellent and effective, low maintenance test automation has enabled many organizations to leap to higher levels of productivity with increased confidence in the test effort. This is where testing has moved and it makes sense to get help to move your own team higher.

In this issue we provide tips and tactics on how to set yourself up for success with outsourcing as well as articles that discuss the direction of IT outsourcing in general. We also have a wealth of past issues, articles, Top 10 lists and information about outsourcing, offshoring, and professional services to augment and super-charge your work force. Take advantage of them.

We’ve also just published our 2015 editorial calendar to give you an idea of what’s ahead for next year, and as always, if you’d like to submit an article, just let us know.

All of us at LogiGear Magazine wish you a joyful and healthy holiday season and a happy new year. We look forward to continuing providing you great software test information in 2015!

Michael Hackett
Michael is a co-founder of LogiGear Corporation, and has over two decades of experience in software engineering in banking, securities, healthcare and consumer electronics. Michael is a Certified Scrum Master and has co-authored two books on software testing. Testing Applications on the Web: Test Planning for Mobile and Internet-Based Systems (Wiley, 2nd ed. 2003), and Global Software Test Automation (Happy About Publishing, 2006). He is a founding member of the Board of Advisors at the University of California Berkeley Extension and has taught for the Certificate in Software Quality Engineering and Management at the University of California Santa Cruz Extension. As a member of IEEE, his training courses have brought Silicon Valley testing expertise to over 16 countries. Michael holds a Bachelor of Science in Engineering from Carnegie Mellon University.

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